Presentation – Script and PowerPoint

Slide 1 – Questionnaires

The product I create my advertisement for was “Story of Lily” – A perfume targeted towards young women. However,  the product was later re-branded as a body mist to appeal more successfully towards my target market of girls ages 14-19.
The decision was made after receiving the results of my primary research. I conducted questionnaires and asked the following:

  • What types of adverts appeal to you most? (Tick all that apply) 

    We asked this to gain an overall insight into what adverts are popular currently as we were new to this perspective of TV advertising.

The majority of the answers liked adverts that were humorous or had a storyline (narrative).

  • What is your favourite advert and why? 

    We asked this to narrow down the above answers and get direct examples of popular TV advertisements.

The most popular answer was the Doritos advert for being funny.

  • What is your least favourite advert and why? 

    We asked this to gain examples of unpopular adverts so we knew what features to steer away from when creating our own advert.

The most popular answer was GoDaddy Loans for being unprofessional and immature.

  • What three words do you associate with Christmas adverts? 

    We asked this to create a form of a word mood board so we could use words and their connotations to inspire our advert and conjure ideas.

Answers included: happy, fantasy, festive, exciting, cute, cheerful, funny, family, food, John Lewis, Christmas trees and Santa

  • Which of the following words do you associate with a perfume advert? 

    Similarly to the above question, we wanted words that not only were associated with Christmas, but more specific words to the actual product.

Answers included: Elegance (said 5 times), lust, love, French, fashion.

  • What is your age? 

    We asked this to determine what particular ages liked so we could create an advert tailored closely to our primary and secondary target audiences.

Answers were from 16 and 17 year olds. This was a positive response as I was able to make sure my advert would appeal to this age group.

The most useful information for me that was taken from this survey were the words that were given that associated with Christmas and perfume. I created a semantic field of elegance and love throughout the advert. I found the other answers somewhat unuseful and next time I would tailor the questions to give answers specifically about perfume or Christmas, as I found the “favourite” adverts to be difficult to gain inspiration from.

The decision to re-brand my product as a body mist, rather than a perfume, was made after the questionnaires and peer feedback. I decided that the term “mist” gave the product a less-mature feel and would encourage parents to purchase it, as they may be happier with their children wearing it opposed to a perfume which can feel “too old”.

 

 

Slide 3 – Inspiration

I took inspirations from existing perfume advertisements such as Nina Ricci’s “Sunday Girl/L’Elixir” advertisement and Nina Ricci’s “L’Eau” perfume advertisement.

 

Play adverts

Both of these adverts hold similar themes and narratives and they also share a semantic field of magic and stereotypical femininity.

 

Slide 4 – Inspiration (Cont.)

Here are some images that demonstrate the correlation between my advertisement and my inspirations.

 

Slide 5 – Going Against the Grain – Costume and Colour

As my advert is aimed towards a younger audience than Nina Ricci’s, I decided to make decisions that go against the grain of typical TV advertisements, particularly for perfume. Some girls of a younger generation these days do present themselves as less feminine, so the actress’ costume was a black skater dress that isn’t typically feminine. She also wore minimal make-up and purple nail varnish which has connotations of mystery and magic.

 

Slide 6 – Going Against the Grain (Cont.)

The music used in the advertisement was an instrumental version of Once Upon A December from the animated film Anastasia. Anastasia is a princess that begins her teenage years finding herself and building courage as she goes on her adventures. I felt this was an appropriate moral and message to carry through my advert for my target audience.

Moreover, perfume adverts also generally tend to be fairly loose in relation to the product and their messages can be unclear (as I found with Nina Ricci’s advert) They don’t offer a direct solution to a problem, as theorised by Mazlow’s hierarchy of needs.

 

Slide 7 – Critique and Peer Feedback

Feedback from my peers on the finished product was very useful. The main comment was that my advert was slightly too long for television, and considering the age of my primary target audience, I would shorten the length of my advertisement next time as young people may lost interest too quickly and not see the product that is featured at the end of the advert.
My teacher felt that there were too many shots of the product, therefore I removed a photo of the product that I originally had at the end of the advert and overlayed the same text over the final hand-held filmed shot of the product at the end instead.

My peers praised my editing and “love[d] the transition from shot to shot”, which I also feel is a strong element in the finished product.

Powerpoint

Tarrin PowerPoint

 

Task 1 – Skim, Scan and Detail reading

Crisis in Effectiveness

SKIM – Describe the article in as much detail as you can after skim reading

Use of humour in advertisements

Advertising used as a form of persuasion to purchase products

SCAN – Describe what you think are the three key points are scan reading

  • Humour is a great technique in advertising
  • Advertising is evolving
  • New technology means new opportunities and interactive advertisements

DETAIL – Now that you have read the article in detail, explain what the article is about

The article is about the crisis that is the effectiveness of advertising and discusses how and where advertising has failed and what techniques and technology can be used to improve the effectiveness of advertising, thus averting the crisis.
The article discusses the use of humour in depth and its effectiveness.
Towards the end of the article the writer discusses the use of technology such as TV and broadband to create successful, interactive advertisements and compares these to less successful advertisements from the early 1990s.

Messages and Meanings

SKIM – Describe the article in as much detail as you can after skim reading

Being lower class was celebrated and women had lower roles and reputation than men

SCAN – Describe what you think are the three key points are scan reading

Women were viewed as sexual objects rather than people of purpose.

Blonde hair appealed more to men than other hair colours. Women that were brunette, for example, would be used for more aspirational advertisements

Using food as a substitute for the male body was used as a seductive form of advertising

DETAIL – Now that you have read the article in detail, explain what the article is about

The article discusses the use of women in advertising and its evolution. It describes women as being either domestic housewives or sexual objects (whores). Towards the end of the article it explains that women’s roles were becoming more powerful and questions why advertisers still maintain the traditional and dated stereotypes.

Task 2b – Review a Report and Make Positive Changes

The first advert I will be discussing in this report is “John Lewis Christmas Advert 2015 – #ManOnTheMoon”. This advert features a young girl, Lily, who sends a message to a lonely man on the moon on Christmas day so he knows someone on earth is thinking of him.

The second advert I will be discussing is “Flash Ah-ah Dog #FlashDog 2016 Advert” featuring a dog and his female owner singing about mud disappearing as a result of “Flash”, a cleaning product.

The John Lewis advert has a strong narrative and is set in a realistic world similar to ours, however it is anti-realist in one respect as it features a man living on the moon and demonstrates the ease a young girl has in sending a gift there via helium balloons. The storyline is linear and begins with the girl seeing the man on the moon through her telescope. The narrative follows her through her attempts to communicate with the man and ends with him receiving his gift.
John Lewis use the warming narrative to tug on the heartstrings of the viewer to support the charity Age UK, personified as the man on the moon.

Although the adverts are for very different products, they do share similarities such as their ability to be applied to Propp and Todorov’s theories

In 1946, Propp, a Russian scholar, created a narrative theory based on the functions and character types. His theory, at the time, applied to fairy takes however it can now be applied to all narratives. Propp recognised that all stories tend to have all, or at least most of the following character types;hero, villain, hero’s helper, doner, dispatcher, false hero, princess (prize) and father.
Similarly, Todorov, a philosopher in 1969, created a narrative theory that said each story follows a pattern and has five stages; equilibrium, disruption, recognition of the disruption, an attempt to repair the disruption, reinstated equilibrium.

John Lewis’ advert only features two characters and thus, in relation to Propp’s theory, Lily is the hero and the happiness of the man on the moon is the princess.

The Flash advert is a humorous and anti-realist and therefore contrasts the John Lewis advert. It features a singing dog (created using CGI and other special effects) and his owner parodies Queen’s “Flash” song to tell a story in a non-linear narrative. It begins with the dog asking “where the hell has all the mud gone?” and the advert then switches to his owner using Flash to remove the mud stains and the scene is captioned “Earlier” to inform the audience the scene featuring the owner is in the past.

Flash are offering the audience a solution to a problem, and therefore this advert follows aspects Todorov’s theory. The characters are brought back to equilibrium after the disruption (mud being all over the house) is recognised and solved by using the product. This advert encourages the audience to use Flash to bring them back to a sense of equilibrium in their every day lives.

The use of music in each advert is a similarity between them. Each piece of music is effective in conveying the intended meanings, although very different also. Flash’s use of the diegetic parody of Queen’s “Flash” song is effective as the lyrics “Where has all the mud gone?” are relevant in the promotion of the product and its qualities. Similarly, John Lewis uses “Half The World Away” by Aurora and its lyrics “you’re half the world away”, although non-diegetic, relate to the narrative of the man on the moon being far away.

Untitled.pngJohn Lewis’ advert, although released just a year before Flash’s, appears more dated and contemporary. Flash’s advert uses CGI to create the singing dog, upbeat music and special effects such as when the owner turns into dramatic lighting being captioned as “earlier” to aid in the telling of the non-linear narrative and give the audience perspective in when her actions took place. These features make the advert appear more modern in comparison to John Lewis’.

John Lewis’ advert is significantly longer than Flash’s and promotes Age UK, therefore it is more focused on conveying a moral and message, whereas Flash’s intentions are simply to advertise and promote a single product.

John Lewis realised that online shopping is becoming increasingly popular and thus they pushed their advert and Age UK campaign to the public through social media, e-newsletters and website advertising. Their campaign was promoted and publicized on a number of platforms including Facebook and YouTube and, statistically, has a vast digital outreach and a raging success.
Retrospectively of this, John Lewis realised a heartstring-tugging advert such as this would encourage viewers to come back to their living rooms and enjoy time with their loved ones without the aid of a computer screen.

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is a description of the needs that encourage and motivate the behaviour of humans. Starting with the basics, Maslow proposed 5 different human needs, survival being the most basic. Physiological needs included food and shelter and these are followed by needs related to safety. Next are feelings of belonging and love. Fourth, the need to be respected and needs related to self esteem. The final need is the need for fulfilling one’s potential and self-actualisation. These needs are in a hierarchy and therefor, for example, the need for basics such as food will be sought before the need for self-actualisation.

John Lewis’ advert conforms to two aspects of Maslow’s hierachy of needs; Actualisation and Social. Within the actualisation need at the top of the hierarchy is a need for improving themselves or others and the advert encourages viewers to give to Age UK to improve other people and thus feel better about themselves. The advert also encourages acceptance of less fortunate people around Christmas and encourages the audience to care for others.

Young and Rubicam created a theory that looks at the brands people buy and how the buyers feel about them. Using Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, they theorised that, depending on their core motivation, there are seven different types of people; The Explorer, The Aspirer, The Succeeder, The Reformer, The Mainstream, The Struggler and The Resigned.

The John Lewis advert appeals to Reformers because they pride themselves on being tolerant and make intellectual choices and therefore will be supportive of Age UK and John Lewis’ intentions.

Flash’s advert appeals to The Mainstreamers as they live “normal”, “everyday” lives and the product is an everyday household item.

The John Lewis advert has two aims; encouraging the viewer to purchase John Lewis products and encourage people to donate to Age UK. John Lewis successfully use a combination of music and warm narratives to appeal to a wide audience. Children will identify with Lily and adults and the elderly will either identify with or feel sympathetic towards the man on the moon.

The Flash advert successfully offers a solution to a common household problem and features humorous content and a parody of a well-known song that people will recognise and remember after the advert has played.

In conclusion, the use of music in these adverts is a common feature and they use their music effectively to create their desired effects and convey their messages and intentions to their audiences. They are both set in realist worlds that contain one unrealistic element, but the use of editing absorbs the audience and encourages the audience to abandon their disbelief and accept these elements as real for the duration of the adverts.

Task 1 (For TV Advertising): Know About The Structures and Techniques of TV Advertisements / Task 2a (For Communication Skills): Advert Comparison Report

The first advert I will be discussing in this report is “John Lewis Christmas Advert 2015 – #ManOnTheMoon”. This advert features a young girl, Lily, who sends a message to a lonely man on the moon on Christmas day so he knows someone on earth is thinking of him.

The second advert I will be discussing is “Flash Ah-ah Dog #FlashDog 2016 Advert” featuring a dog and his female owner singing about mud disappearing as a result of “Flash”, a cleaning product.

The third advert is Booking.com’s “Booking.yeah” advert that uses the word “booking” as a substitute for profanities.

Advert Structures

The John Lewis advert has a strong narrative and is set in a realistic world similar to ours, however it is anti-realist in one respect as it features a man living on the moon and demonstrates the ease a young girl has in sending a gift there via helium balloons. The narrative is linear and begins with the girl seeing the man on the moon through her telescope. The narrative follows her through her attempts to communicate with the man and ends with him receiving his gift.
John Lewis use the warming narrative to tug on the heartstrings of the viewer to support the charity Age UK, personified as the man on the moon.

In 1946, Propp, a Russian scholar, created a narrative theory based on the functions and character types. His theory, at the time, applied to fairy tales however it can now be applied to all narratives. Propp recognised that all stories tend to have all, or at least most of the following character types;hero, villain, hero’s helper, doner, dispatcher, false hero, princess (prize) and father.
Similarly, Todorov, a philosopher in 1969, created a narrative theory that said each story follows a pattern and has five stages; equilibrium, disruption, recognition of the disruption, an attempt to repair the disruption, reinstated equilibrium.

John Lewis’ advert only features two characters and thus, in relation to Propp’s theory, Lily is the hero and the happiness of the man on the moon is the princess.

The Flash advert is a humorous and anti-realist as it features a singing dog and his owner parodying Queen’s “Flash” song to tell a story in a non-linear narrative. It begins with the dog asking “where the hell has all the mud gone?” and the advert then switches to his owner using Flash to remove the mud stains and the scene is captioned “Earlier” to inform the audience the scene featuring the owner is in the past.

Flash are offering the audience a solution to a problem, and therefore this advert follows aspects Todorov’s theory. The characters are brought back to equilibrium after the disruption (mud being all over the house) is recognised and solved by using the product. This advert encourages the audience to use Flash to bring them back to a sense of equilibrium in their every day lives.

The Booking.com advert features scenes of various people arriving at their holiday destinations. The advert is linear and follows each group of people travelling to their destination, unlocking the door, and reacting to their destination. The advert features a non-diegetic voiceover saying “You got it booking right” in response to their positive reactions.

As the Booking.com advert features snippets of individual narratives, it’s difficult to apply Propp’s theory directly to each character, however each group of people could be described at the Hero and the success of their booking/their destinations could be described as The Princess/The Prize. Todorov’s theory, however, can be applied as the sense of equilibrium is demonstrated when the groups reach their destinations and the disruption of their uncertainty during their journeys is diminished.

Regulation

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) regulates all advertisements in the UK and has the power to remove advertisements if there is a problem or complaint with them and they feel it necessary to take it down. For TV and radio advertising, the ASA regulate under a contract of Ofcom.

The Booking.com advert caused concern and was regulated by the ASA as people recognised the used of “booking” being used as a substitute for a swear word. Audiences were also concerned and challenged whether the advert being aired on CITV or between Harry Potter were appropriate scheduled times due to children being easily influenced by the profanity substitute.
Despite the 2345 complaints and the advert breaking codes such as 1.3 (Marketing communications must be prepared with a sense of responsibility to consumers and to society), the ASA didn’t uphold the complaints and allowed it to air. Booking.com said “purpose of the ad was to reinforce brand recognition and association in respect of the word ‘booking’ as both a company name and website URL”, hence why the word was repeated so often. The ASA didn’t believe the word “booking” was close enough to the word “f****ing” and therefore didn’t feel children would be able to repeat the word and cause offense.

Audience

John Lewis realised that online shopping is becoming increasingly popular and thus they pushed their advert and Age UK campaign to the public through social media, e-newsletters and website advertising. Their campaign was promoted and publicized on a number of platforms including Facebook and YouTube and, statistically, has a vast digital outreach and a raging success.
Retrospectively of this, John Lewis realised a heartstring-tugging advert such as this would encourage viewers to come back to their living rooms and enjoy time with their loved ones without the aid of a computer screen.

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is a description of the needs that encourage and motivate the behaviour of humans. Starting with the basics, Maslow proposed 5 different human needs, survival being the most basic. Physiological needs included food and shelter and these are followed by needs related to safety. Next are feelings of belonging and love. Fourth, the need to be respected and needs related to self esteem. The final need is the need for fulfilling one’s potential and self-actualisation. These needs are in a hierarchy and therefor, for example, the need for basics such as food will be sought before the need for self-actualisation.

John Lewis’ advert conforms to two aspects of Maslow’s hierachy of needs; Actualisation and Social. Within the actualisation need at the top of the hierarchy is a need for improving themselves or others and the advert encourages viewers to give to Age UK to improve other people and thus feel better about themselves. The advert also encourages acceptance of less fortunate people around Christmas and encourages the audience to care for others.

Flash’s advert appeals to the Safety needs as the product being advertised is for use in the home to keep it clean and a healthy environment.

Booking.com’s advert appeals to the Esteem and Self-Actualization aspects of Maslow’s hierarchy as the advert features spontaneity and achievement.

Young and Rubicam created a theory that looks at the brands people buy and how the buyers feel about them. Using Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, they theorised that, depending on their core motivation, there are seven different types of people; The Explorer, The Aspirer, The Succeeder, The Reformer, The Mainstream, The Struggler and The Resigned.

The John Lewis advert appeals to Reformers because they pride themselves on being tolerant and make intellectual choices and therefore will be supportive of Age UK and John Lewis’ intentions.

Flash’s advert appeals to The Mainstreamers as they live “normal”, “everyday” lives and the product is an everyday household item.

Booking.com’s advert appeals to The Succeeder as they strive for achievement of goals and being organised to get there. The advert features people’s goals of finding good accommodation being fulfilled and them seeking the best of the best. Succeeders enjoy brands and high-end products and would use a mainstream site such as Booking.com to quench their thirst for the best.

Conclusion

The John Lewis advert has two aims; encouraging the viewer to purchase John Lewis products and encourage people to donate to Age UK. John Lewis successfully use a combination of music and warm narratives to appeal to a wide audience. Children will identify with Lily and adults and the elderly will either identify with or feel sympathetic towards the man on the moon.

The Flash advert successfully offers a solution to a common household problem and features humorous content and a parody of a well-known song that people will recognise and remember after the advert has played.

The Booking.com advert successfully advertises what the product (The website) is for and demonstrated different outcomes and scenarios from using the product. The advert is humorous and the continued repetition of the word “booking” may resonate with the audience, particularly with adults, who will appreciate it as a substitute for a swear word.

 

 

Ender’s Game Word Synopsis Task

40 Words:
Based on the novel by Orson Scott Card, Enders Game is a science fiction action film set in Earth’s future about a gifted child, Ender, sent to a military academy in outer space to prepare for a future alien invasion.

Reduced by 20%:
Enders Game is a science fiction action film set in Earth’s future about a gifted child, Ender, sent to a military academy in outer space to prepare for a future alien invasion.

Score: 100%

Pixar’s “La Luna (2011)” Short Film Review – UNFINISHED

 

http://www.ukfilmreview.co.uk

A boy’s father and grandfather take him out to sea, where he discovers their unusual line of work.
Initial releaseFebruary 10, 2012 (USA)
DirectorEnrico Casarosa
Initial DVD releaseNovember 13, 2012 (USA)
Pixar’s La Luna is a “coming of age” story of a young boy accompanying his father and grandfather in their peculiar line of work.
Initially it appears that the father and grandfather are cut from the same mould, wearing overalls and hats and carrying brooms. However, their differences in opinions such as the way in which a broom should be used or a hat should be worn lead to bickering in front of the timid boy, encouraging his sense of curiosity and wonder to flourish and bring him joy.

Director Casarosa’s unique animation style truly shines in this film as the abandonment of “perfection” created by traditional computer animation is abandoned. Casarosa’s use of watercolours to create texture