Task 1 – Written Report

Task One – Written Report

To research my programme I could undertake quantitative and qualitative research. Research is a crucial element in creating a product as it provides an insight into a potential target audience so their needs can be met.

Quantitive Research

Quantitative research is statistical research that collects information in mathematical forms such as polls and graphs.

For my programme I could undertake quantitative research by researching similar and existing products in the industry. I could research into things such as box office statistics (how much money has been made), programme website hits and programme ratings (the estimated audience profiles and size of a similar product).

From the above research I can create graphs and charts that can allow me to have a visual guide that can enhance my product by showing my research results clearly.

Qualitative Research

Qualitative research is exploratory research and is essentially the opposite of quantitative research. It contains less statistics and provides room for opinions and hypotheses.

Forms of qualitative research I could undertake could include reviews (film, game, etc) focus groups and face-to-face interviews.

Reviews, particularly of films, would be particularly useful when researching for my product. A review, for example, of a Tarantino film would allow me to gauge an audience’s values and attitudes towards his products.

A questionnaire could contain a mixture of both quantitative and qualitative research. The qualitative research could be undertaken using open questions that require more than a one-worded or “yes or no” answer.
These questions allow the answerers to give detailed answers and can include their opinions and desires.

Questionnaires are a form of primary research as it obtains new information that is researched by me/the company and it is original.

In addition to questionnaires, interviews and observations are other forms of primary research. Others include focus groups or the participation in internet forums.

Secondary research is information gained from other sources and thus is the opposite of primary research. This form of research uses other people or organisation’s research and can be found in journals, books, internet or interviews governed by other people.

There are advantages and disadvantages of both primary and secondary research.

Advantages of primary research include it being current/up to date, the ability to focus on specific issues through personalised questionnaires of focus groups, and it is also protected as it’s typically concealed for the private use of the company.

However, in comparison to secondary research that is quick and inexpensive, it is often more time consuming and expensive as the costs of conducting and preparing the research can be quite high.

In addition to being easy and low-cost, secondary research can also aid in the clarification of primary research being learned and it’s often used for this purpose prior to large-scale primary research.

Audience research is essential as it helps to find out  the age, behaviours and attitudes of the audience so we can gauge how likely they are to purchase or enjoy the product.

Market research is conducted to look at current competition in existing products and is  how the audience will be reached. Market research identifies competition and the ways in which the product should be advertised. It also draws comparison between itself and existing products on the market.

Production research is conducted to look at the viability (how successfully the product will be), logistics and expenses of the product.